A.INTRODUCTION

B.CHAPTER-SPECIFIC ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

C.PPE PROGRAM COMPONENTS

D. HAZARD ASSESSMENT

E. PROPER SELECTION AND ISSUANCE OF PPE

F. SPECIFIC PPE SELECTION REQUIREMENTS

  1. Eye/Face Protection
  2. Foot Protection.
  3. Head Protection
  4. Hand Protection
  5. Body Protection/Protective Clothing.
  6. Electrical Protective Devices
  7. Respiratory Protection
  8. Hearing Protection
  9. Fall Protection
  10. Water Safety

G.CLEANING AND MAINTENANCE

H. TRAINING

I. REQUIRED INSPECTIONS AND SELF ASSESSMENTS

J. RECORDS AND REPORTS

K. REFERENCES

Attachment 1 - PPE Hazard Assessment Certification Form
Attachment 2 - Eye and Face Protection Selection Guide
Attachment 3 - Chemical Protective Glove and Clothing Selection Guide
Attachment 4 - PPE Issuance and Training Certification- Example 1
Attachment 5 - PPE Inspection Form
Attachment 6- Prescription Safety Glasses Request Procedures
Attachment 7 - Safety Shoe Request Procedures


CHAPTER 17 - PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

A. INTRODUCTION

1. The purpose of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is to protect employees from the risk of injury or illness by creating a proper barrier against workplace hazards. PPE is NOT a substitute for good engineering or administrative controls, or good work practices, in eliminating the hazard source. However, when used in conjunction with these controls, or in the interim as more permanent controls are implemented, PPE can serve as an effective means of reducing risk.

2. This Chapter applies to all Smithsonian Institution (SI) personnel who, by nature of their job function, have the potential to be adversely exposed to (or come in contact with) chemical, physical, radiological, or biological hazards. This Chapter provides information on recognizing those conditions that require PPE, as well as selecting PPE for hazardous activities.

3. This Chapter addresses the overall PPE program of hazard identification, PPE selection, use, and maintenance, and shall conform, at minimum, to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Standard 1910 Subpart I, "Personal Protective Equipment," including:

a. 1910.132 - "General Requirements;"

b. 1910.133 - "Eye and Face Protection;"

c. 1910.135 - "Head Protection;"

d. 1910.136 - "Occupational Foot Protection;"

e. 1910.137 - "Electrical Protective Devices;" and

f. 1910.138 - "Hand Protection."

Additional specific PPE requirements are also included in every operational topic chapter in this Manual.

 

B. CHAPTER-SPECIFIC ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

1.Safety Coordinators shall assist supervisors in conducting and reviewing their PPE Hazard Assessments and identifying appropriate PPE, and training in the proper use, care and storage of PPE when applicable.

2. Supervisors shall:

a. Assess work areas for hazards with assistance as needed from their Safety Coordinator and Office of Safety, Health and Environmental Management (OSHEM).

b. When necessary reassess work area certifications and notify the Safety Coordinator when a hazard or process changes, which could render previously used PPE ineffective.

c. Select and provide appropriate PPE and make it available to their employees.

d. Ensure employees are trained in the proper use, cleaning, maintenance, inspection and storage of PPE.

e. Ensure that affected employees wear any and all PPE during tasks that require protection.

f. Ensure that defective or damaged PPE is not used and immediately replaced.

g. Maintain documentation of individual employee PPE issuance and training per requirements of this Chapter.

3. Employees shall:

a. Wear PPE as directed by their supervisor.

b. Participate in PPE training.

c. Inspect, clean, maintain and store properly assigned PPE.

d. Notify their supervisor of the need to replace or repair PPE.

e. Notify their supervisor when a hazard or process changes, which may render previously used PPE ineffective.

f. Notify their supervisor of any other changes (e.g., medical conditions, physical changes) that may require assigned PPE to be re-evaluated for proper fit.

4. Office of Safety, Health and Environmental Management (OSHEM) shall provide technical assistance to Directors, Safety Coordinators, and supervisors in carrying out their responsibilities under this Chapter. Technical assistance may include:

a. Evaluating employee exposures and advising as to the appropriate PPE controls.

b. Conducting PPE training as required by specific chapters, such asChapter 18, "Respiratory Protection" of this Manual and Chapter 41, "Occupational Noise" of this Manual, or assisting Safety Coordinators in providing other PPE training.

c. Providing medical clearance examinations, when applicable, for suitability of employee to wear required PPE.


C. PPE PROGRAM COMPONENTS

An effective PPE program must include the following four steps:

1. PPE hazard assessment of the work place.

2. Proper selection and assignment of PPE.

3. Training users in the correct fit, use, care, and storage of PPE

4. Cleaning, maintenance and inspection methods for PPE.

 

D. HAZARD ASSESSMENT

1. Supervisors shall inspect/assess work areas and review work operations to identify potential hazards and to determine which types of PPE should be used to protect employees. Depending on the severity of the hazard the area may need to be inspected more frequently. When a supervisor needs assistance he/she should contact the facility Safety Coordinator or OSHEM staff.

2. Attachment 1, "PPE Hazard Assessment Certification" or equivalent, shall be completed as a component of the PPE program.

3. Certified PPE hazard assessments shall be reviewed and modified, as needed, to address changing site conditions or operations.

 

E. PROPER SELECTION AND ISSUANCE OF PPE

1. Hazard Control Priorities. Supervisors shall make efforts to eliminate or reduce the identified hazards through product or process substitution, engineering controls (physically changing a machine or work environment) or administrative controls (changing how or when employees perform their job) must first be attempted. If the hazards cannot be reduced to an acceptable risk by any of these methods, then PPE shall be selected that will protect employees from the identified hazards.

2. PPE Cautions. PPE devices alone shall not be relied on to provide protection against hazards, but shall be used in conjunction with feasible engineering controls, administration controls, and safe work practices.

3. PPE Selection. After identification of workplace hazards has been completed, the Safety Coordinator shall assist the supervisor in making PPE product and selection recommendations. Selection shall be based on the technical requirements of this and applicable other chapters in this Manual, and with careful consideration of the following factors:

4. Supervisors shall reassess the workplace by identifying and evaluating new equipment and or processes, review accident records and revaluate the suitability of previously selected PPE.

a. Application - what part of the body is being protected?

b. Chemical resistance - will the PPE material maintain its structural integrity and protective qualities? If hazardous materials are a concern, the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) shall also be reviewed for PPE recommendations.

c. Strength - is the PPE material resistant to punctures, tears, and abrasions?

d. Flexibility - does PPE provide the necessary dexterity and tactile sensitivity required of the task?

e. Thermal limits - does the PPE material maintain its mobility and protective capacity in temperature extremes?

f. Cleanable - can the material be easily decontaminated and reused?

g. Longevity - will the material resist aging?

h. Ergonomic considerations (comfort and fit) - will the equipment be extremely uncomfortable (increasing the likelihood of its not being worn or worn properly), excessively restrict movement, or lead to ergonomic injuries when used in this task?

5. Selection must meet the minimum technical criteria applicable to the hazard. However, the choice of models meeting these criteria are often varied and therefore input from the affected employees as to the final selection is to be solicited. Employee involvement will greatly enhance wearer acceptance.

6. SI will provide the PPE required by the job function, per this Manual, at no cost to the employee. Employees will not provide or bring into the workplace from home, their own PPE.

7. All PPE shall be of safe design and construction for the work performed.

8. Hazard assessments, training certification and the PPE issuance is required per this chapter, and shall be documented for each employee, using the examples, or their practical equivalent, of Attachments 4.

 

F. SPECIFIC PPE SELECTION REQUIREMENTS

1. Eye/Face Protection

a. Eye protection and/or face protection shall be worn when there is the potential for exposure to the eyes or face from flying particles, molten metal, chemical splashes, gases or vapors, or potentially injurious light radiation.

b. Workers with prescription eyeglasses are entitled, to receive prescription safety glasses if required in their work. Regular eyeglasses or contact lenses must not be used as eye protection against flying particles because they do not meet ANSI impact-resistant standards. Refer to Attachment 6, for procedures on obtaining safety eyewear at the SI.

c. Employees whose vision requires the use of corrective lenses, and whose job duties require goggles or face shields in the course of their work, must be provided a type of goggle or full-face shield that can be worn over their prescription lenses.

d. There are four general classes of eye and face protection: safety glasses, goggles, face shields and welding helmets. The type of protection required shall be determined by the type and degree of the hazard, and shall comply with OSHA 29 CFR 1910.133, "Eye and Face Protection," and the American National Standard Institute (ANSI) Standard Z87.1-2003 "Practice for Occupational and Educational Personal Eye and Face Protective Devices." Refer to Attachment 2, "Eye and Face Protection Selection Guide," for additional information on eye and face protection.

(1) Safety glasses.

(a) Basic safety glasses (spectacles) are to be used only as protection against frontal impact hazards. Side protection shall be required when there is a lateral hazard from flying particles. Detachable side protectors (e.g., clip-on or slide-on shields) meeting ANSI requirements are acceptable but not recommended, as they do not offer the same sturdy coverage as safety glasses that are constructed with side protection.

(b) Safety glasses are not to be used for protection against mists, dusts, gases, vapors, or liquid splashes, because they will not protect the eyes from these agents.

(c) Safety glasses with specially tinted lenses [per 29 CFR 1910.133(a)(5)] are to be used for protection against impact and optical radiation hazards, such as from welding, ultraviolet light sources, or lasers. These operate by reducing transmittance of specific wavelengths of concern. They are designated by shade numbers corresponding to the radiation hazard.

(2) Safety goggles are to be used for protection against splash or irritation fromliquid chemicals, gases, or fine particulates. They are also rated for impact protection, and may provide optical radiation protection if tinted to the appropriate shade. They are designed to fit snugly, and are designed in 3 basic configurations:

(a) Direct vented goggleshave air holes or slits on the top and sides of the goggle and provide direct air passage. This type offers the least protection and is not to be used for jobs with the potential for chemical splash or vapors.

(b) Indirect vented goggles have deflector caps over the side and top ventilation holes, and so may prevent the direct entry of chemicals into the goggle, while providing some relief from fogging. This type is to be used for tasks in which the potential for chemical splash is low to moderate.

(c) Unvented goggles are to be used for protection against gases or vapors which can be irritating to the eyes or easily absorbed through the eye (such as ammonia or formaldehyde), or when the risk is high of substantial liquid chemical splash.

(3) Face shields, in addition to safety glasses, are to be worn when working with large volumes of hazardous materials, where the potential exists for significant chemical splash to the face, neck, and ears. Face shields do not offer adequate impact protection and so must never be worn alone (if impact is a concern), but always over the appropriate type of safety spectacle or goggle.

(4) Welding helmets and goggles for optical radiation hazards

(a) Welding helmets, worn over safety glasses or goggles, are to be used when protection is required for the worker's eyes, ears, face, and front of neck against weld splatter. Welding helmets/goggles must have a tinted window (meeting the appropriate transmittance requirements) to protect against optical radiation.

(b) Ultraviolet, infrared, and visible glare radiation hazards require workers to wear goggles with appropriate degrees of shading to protect against the intensity of the radiation.

2. Foot Protection

a. Foot protection (closed toed) shall be worn when there is the potential for injury to the feet from falling or rolling objects, objects piercing the sole of the foot, electrical hazards, hot surfaces and slippery surfaces.

b. Attachment 7 provides detailed information on obtaining safety shoes or boots at the SI.

c. Foot protection shall comply with OSHA 29 CFR 1910.136, "Occupational Foot Protection," and ASTM F 2413-05 Standard Specifications for Performance Requirements for Foot Protection.

d. Safety shoes will be recommended only when the process or task warrants such protection (i.e., if there is a danger from heavy equipment or objects falling or rolling over the foot).

e. Shoes that offer complete foot coverage (i.e., no sandals or open-toed shoes) are to be worn in the chemical laboratory or any work area with the potential for chemical spills or broken glass.

f. The boot material must be chemically-resistant if the work has the potential for significant chemical contact. (see F. 5 in this Chapter).

g. Foot protection must be constructed so as not to create a spark or generate static electricity in areas electrically classified for fire or explosion hazards. h. Foot protection must be non-conductive if the work poses an electrical hazard.(see F. 6 of this chapter).

i. Foot protection must be slip-resistant.for work in slippery conditions.

j. ORTHOPEDIC SAFETY SHOES

Employees who believe they may need or are instructed by their doctor that they need orthopedic safety shoes should submit their requests on Form SI-3389, (attachment 7) as described above,(2b) however locating a supplier for the shoes is the responsibility of the employee. Employees must also obtain and submit one bid for the price of approved orthopedic safety shoes. All expenses of obtaining a prescription for orthopedic safety shoes, locating a supplier, and acquiring the bid for purchase of the shoes must be paid for by the employee. Organizational units shall pay for the cost of the orthopedic safety shoes.

3. Head Protection

a. Head protection shall be worn when:

(1) There is a potential for injury to the head from impact or flying objects;

(2) There is a potential for injury to the head from falling objects (e.g., working below other workers who are using tools and materials which could be dropped);

(3) Any employee enters a construction site;

(4) There is danger of contact with energized power lines or equipment;

(5) Hair may be caught in machinery; or

(6) Sanitary protection is required.

b. Hard hats worn for protection against impact and penetration of falling objects shall comply with OSHA 29 CFR 1910.135, "Head Protection," and the ANSI Standard Z89.1.2003, "American National Standard for Industrial Head Protection." Hard hats worn for protection against electrical shock and burns shall comply with ANSI Standard Z89.1.2003 Class E requirements.

c. Any hard hat that has been subjected to damage, especially by impact, must be discarded.

d. Any hard hat that demonstrates signs of ultraviolet (sunlight) degradation must be discarded. (Degradation of plastic by UV light will cause the glossy finish of the plastic to fade, turn chalky, and eventually fall apart).

e. The "Useful Service Lifeline Guide" suggests that hard hats used regularly, with no visible signs of damage, be replaced every 5 years. The manufacturing date of the hard hat is stamped on the inside.

f. The webbing in hard hats should be replaced after 12 months.

4. Hand Protection

a. Hand protection shall be worn when hands are exposed to hazards such as skin absorption of harmful substances, severe cuts or lacerations, severe abrasions, punctures, chemical burns, thermal burns and harmful temperature extremes.

b. The type of hand protection used shall conform to the requirements in OSHA 29 CFR 1910.138, "Hand Protection," and shall be based on:

(1) Performance characteristics of the hand protection relative to the task(s) to be performed;

(2) Conditions present;

(3) Duration of use; and

(4) Hazards or potential hazards identified.

c. When selecting gloves for protection against chemical hazards, including their vapor or gaseous forms, consider the following (see Attachment 3 for additional guidance):

(1) The toxic properties of the chemical(s) shall be determined; especially the ability of the chemical to cause local effects on the skin and/or to be absorbed by the skin and cause systemic effects.

(2) Glove materials are eventually permeated by chemicals. However, gloves may be used safely for limited periods if specific use and glove characteristics (i.e., thickness, permeation rate, and time) are known. Common glove materials include: neoprene, polyvinyl chloride, nitrile, and butyl and natural rubbers. These materials differ in their resistance to various substances.

(3) For mixtures and formulated products (unless specific test data are available), a glove shall be selected based on the chemical component with the shortest breakthrough time. It is possible for solvents to carry active ingredients through polymeric (a chemical compound or mixture of compounds formed by polymerization and consisting essentially of repeating structural units) materials.

d. Thin, surgical-type gloves (latex, vinyl, nitrile are most common) can be protective against incidental contact with certain chemicals, but are not to be used as protection during full immersion or prolonged contact with chemicals.

e. Latex (natural rubber) containing products must not be used by persons allergic to latex. Consult OSHEM for further assistance.

f. Employees shall be able to remove the gloves in a way that prevents skin contamination.

g. Refer to the glove manufacturer's chemical resistance specifications when choosing a glove material, and consult with NIOSH Recommendations for Chemical Protective Clothing: A Companion to the NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards

5. Body Protection/Protective Clothing.

a. Body protection/protective clothing shall be worn when there is a potential for exposure to other parts of the body (e.g., legs, arms, back, chest and feet) from:

(1) Excessive heat or cold;

(2) Hot liquid or molten metal splashes;

(3) Radiation;

(4) Impacts or cuts; or

(5) The contact or absorption effects of acids, alkalis, and other hazardous chemicals.

b. Selection of body protection/protective clothing depends on the type of hazardous exposure, the working environment, and the task to be performed (see Attachment 3 for additional guidance). Body protection/protective clothing may include one or more of the following items:

(1) Lab coats or jackets;

(2) Leather chaps and sleeves;

(3) Aprons or vests;

(4) Cotton coveralls; and/or

(5) Poly-coated or saran-coated tyvek suits.

(6) High visibility apparel

c. Live animal handlers shall wear, as necessary and in addition to proper gloves, arm protection against injury from animals (bites, scratches).

d. An employee's personal work clothes are to fit his/her work assignment. The minimum protection required is a full short sleeve "T" shirt (tank shirts and cut down "T" shirts are not permitted) and long pants. These work clothes will help to prevent sunburn, plant rashes, abrasions and insect bites, and to afford some protection against flying particles and accidental spills of liquids. Shorts may be approved for some work duties (e.g., mail carriers) that do not present hazards to the skin. Any exceptions shall first be approved by your supervisor and the Safety Coordinator.

e. Latex (natural rubber) containing products must not be used by persons allergic to latex. Consult OSHEM for further assistance.

f. Refer to the glove manufacturer's chemical resistance specifications when choosing a glove material, and consult with NIOSH Recommendations for Chemical Protective Clothing: A Companion to the NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards

6. Electrical Protective Devices

a. Rubber insulating equipment shall be used to protect employees from shocks/burns while working on/near "live" electrical systems and equipment. Electrical protective devices shall comply with OSHA 29 CFR 1910.137, "Electrical Protective Devices."

b. Electrical protective PPE shall be inspected for damage, deterioration, and visible defects before each day's use, and immediately after an incident suspected of causing damage. Supervisors shall ensure the proper use of electrical protective PPE (e.g., gloves not turned inside out, leather protectors in place, etc.).

c. Supervisors shall ensure that a hard hat designed to reduce electrical shock hazard is worn by each affected employee when near exposed electrical conductors which could contact the head.

d. Supervisors shall ensure that occupational safety footwear designed to reduce electrical shock hazard is worn by each affected employee when near exposed electrical conductors which could contact the feet.

e. Rubber insulating equipment shall comply with the following American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards:

(1) Specification for Rubber Insulating Gloves (D120-87);

(2) Specification for Rubber Insulating Matting (ASTM D178-93 or D178-88);

(3) Specification for Rubber Insulating Blankets (ASTM D1048-93 or D1048-88a);

(4) Specification for Rubber Insulating Covers (ASTM D1049-93 or D1049-88);

(5) Specification for Rubber Insulating Line Hose (ASTM D1050-90); and

(6) Specification for Rubber Insulating Sleeves (ASTM D1051-87).

f. All electrical protective equipment shall be subjected to periodic electrical tests conducted in accordance with voltages identified by American Society of Testing Materials (ASTM) standards to indicate if the insulating equipment can withstand the voltage involved. Insulating equipment that fails to pass an inspection or electrical test shall be removed from service immediately, tagged with a "Do Not Use" sign, and discarded. Rubber insulating equipment test intervals shall be performed:

(1) Rubber insulating line hoses shall be tested upon indication that the insulating valve is suspect.

(2) Rubber insulating covers shall be tested upon indication that the insulating valve is suspect.

(3) Rubber insulating blankets shall be tested before first issue and every 12 months thereafter.

(4) Rubber insulating gloves shall be tested before first issue and every six months thereafter.

(5) Rubber insulating sleeves shall be tested before first issue and every 12 months thereafter.

g. Insulating equipment that has not been electrically tested within the previous 12 months shall not be placed into service. Supervisors shall be responsible for making test arrangements for rubber insulating equipment. Supervisors shall retain test results on file for the duration of use of the insulating equipment item.

7. Respiratory Protection. Selection and use of respiratory protection shall be in accordance with Chapter 18, "Respiratory Protection", of this Manual.

8. Hearing Protection. Selection and use of hearing protection shall be in accordance with Chapter 41, "Occupational Noise", of this Manual.

9. Fall Protection. Selection and use of fall protection shall be in accordance with Chapter 10, "Fall Protection", of this Manual.

10. Water Safety. If a project/task will require employees to perform activities on or adjacent to water, employees must don a personal flotation device (PFD). PFDs shall be U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) approved Type I, II, or III floatation devices, and must be of the appropriate size for the intended wearer.

 

G. CLEANING, MAINTENANCE, AND INSPECTION of PPE

1. All PPE provided shall be used and maintained in a sanitary and reliable condition, and in accordance with manufacturer's recommendations and the provisions of this Manual.

2. The PPE Hazard Assessment is to state whether gloves and other chemical protective clothing are capable of being washed/decontaminated after use or whether it must be discarded after use (typically for use with highly hazardous materials). Consult the Safety Coordinator for technical assistance.

3. Lab coats used for protection against hazardous materials must not be taken home to be washed, but must either be washed on premises in a dedicated washer or sent to a commercial launderer or uniform cleaning company who has been notified that the lab clothing may be contaminated with hazardous materials.

4. Employees shall inspect all PPE (using Attachment 5 or its equivalent) prior to each use for tears, punctures, holes, cuts, cracks, embedded foreign objects and texture changes (e.g., swelling, softening, hardening, becoming sticky, inelasticity). Changes in glove color or hardening indicates degradation, requiring the glove to be replaced.

5. Damaged or dirty PPE shall be discarded, changed and/or decontaminated. At a minimum, all PPE shall be discarded when it has become excessively contaminated, worn, torn or has other integrity problems.

6. Any PPE that has been subjected to damage, especially by impact, must be discarded.

7. A determination of whether contaminated PPE must be disposed of as hazardous waste (refer to Chapter 29, "Hazardous Waste Management", of this Manual) is to be made during the PPE hazard assessment process, with assistance from the Safety Coordinator.

 

H. TRAINING

1. Any employee who is required to wear PPE shall receive training on the proper use and care of the assigned PPE, to ensure that maximum protection is achieved by wearing the PPE correctly and maintaining it in good condition. The training shall be provided by the supervisor, with assistance as needed from the Safety Coordinator.

2. PPE issuance and certification of training per this Chapter shall be documented for each employee, using the example, or their practical equivalent, of Attachments 4. Documentation is to be maintained by the supervisor and/or Safety Coordinator.

3. The training shall include at least the following subjects:

a. When PPE is necessary to be worn, and why (i.e., the results of the Hazard Assessment);

b. What PPE is necessary for each task;

c. How to properly don, do, adjust, and wear PPE;

d. The limitations of the PPE; and

e. The proper care, cleaning, useful life, storage and maintenance of PPE;

f. How to properly inspect PPE for signs of damage or wear, and how to tell when the PPE needs repair or replacement.

4. As part of the training, employees shall demonstrate their ability to use, maintain, and inspect their assigned PPE properly before being allowed to perform work requiring its use.

5. Retraining will be required under the following circumstances:

a. Changes in the workplace render previous training obsolete.

b. Changes in the types of PPE to be used render previous training obsolete.

c. Evidence that the employee does not understand the need for, or proper use, maintenance or inspection of assigned PPE.

6. Training documentation must verify that the affected employee has received and understood the required PPE training, through a written certification containing the name of each employee trained, the date(s) of training, and the subject of the training. The Personal Protective Equipment Issuance and Training Certification (example in Attachments 4) or equivalent, is to be used to document all PPE training received by an individual employee. Supplemental training documentation (e.g., group training sign-in logs or the OSHEM issued respiratory protection training memorandum) must include at least the name of the employee, date(s) and subject of the training.

 

I. REQUIRED INSPECTIONS AND SELF ASSESSMENTS

1. Hazard Assessments shall be reviewed and modified to address changing site conditions or operations as necessary.

2. The supervisor shall evaluate the condition and effectiveness of required PPE at least monthly or more often as warranted. Attachment 5, "Personal Protective Equipment Inspection Form", or equivalent, shall be used to perform and document PPE inspections.

3. Refer to Section F (6) above for rubber insulating equipment testing information.

4. PPE that does not withstand daily workplace rigors shall be re-evaluated and replaced with alternatives that are more suitable.

5. In-Use Monitoring

a. Chemical degradation or permeation of PPE and worker heat/cold stress may significantly affect the length of time an employee can work in PPE. PPE in‑use monitoring shall include observations of chemical degradation or permeation of PPE, signs or symptoms of heat/cold stress, visual monitoring of PPE for signs of degradation or rips and tears.

b. Limitations on the length of time an employee can work may be expected during the summer and winter months. Employees shall be monitored for potential heat stress illnesses in accordance with Chapter 42, "Temperature Extremes: Heat" of this Manual. Employees shall be monitored for potential cold stress injuries in accordance with Chapter 43, "Temperature Extremes: Cold", of this Manual.

c. Employees shall report any perceived problem or difficulties with PPE to their supervisor or Safety Coordinator, including any signs or symptoms of heat stress (e.g., rapid pulse, nausea, fatigue) or cold stress (e.g., sluggish pulse, fatigue); chest pains, discomfort, interference with vision or communication, restriction of movement, unusual residue on PPE, or skin irritation.

d. Modifications to PPE may be made based on the findings of in‑use monitoring.

 

J. RECORDS AND REPORTS

1. Supervisors shall maintain a copy of PPE Hazard Assessment Certifications applicable to their workplace, along with related PPE certified training and PPE issuance forms, for a minimum of 5 years.

2. Supervisors shall retain insulating equipment test results on file for the duration of use of the insulating equipment item.

 

K. REFERENCES

1. U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety Administration (OSHA), Safety and Health Topics, "Personal Protective Equipment (PPE): Hazards and Solutions"

2. OSHA Fact Sheet, "Personal Protective Equipment," 2002

3. OSHA 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Standard 1910 Subpart I, "Personal Protective Equipment," including:

a. 1910.132 - "General Requirements;"

b. 1910.133 - "Eye and Face Protection;"

c. 1910.135 - "Head Protection;"

d. 1910.136 - "Occupational Foot Protection;"

e. 1910.137 - "Electrical Protective Devices;" and

f. 1910.138 - "Hand Protection."

4. American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards:

a. Specification for Rubber Insulating Gloves (D120-87);

b. Specification for Rubber Insulating Matting (ASTM D178-93 or D178-88);

c. Specification for Rubber Insulating Blankets (ASTM D1048-93 or D1048-88a);

d. Specification for Rubber Insulating Covers (ASTM D1049-93 or D1049-88);

e. Specification for Rubber Insulating Line Hose (ASTM D1050-90);

f. Specification for Rubber Insulating Sleeves (ASTM D1051-87); and

g. Specifications for Performance Requirements for Foot Protection (ASTM F 2413-05).

5. American National Standard Institute (ANSI) Standard Z89.1.2003, “American National Standard for Industrial Head Protection.”

6. ANSI Standard Z87.1-2003 “Practice for Occupational and Educational Personal Eye and Face Protective Devices.”

7. ANSI Standard Z41.1-1991, "American National Standard for Personal Protection - Protective Footwear."

8. Oklahoma State University Chemical Guide and Permeation Tables.